Daily Archives: May 6, 2018

A Smile to Remember

dental veneersIncredible though it may seem, there are some people today who actively avoid having their picture taken and would never dream of indulging in a sneaky selfie. These people are often those who are ashamed of the state of their teeth, and rarely smile. What they need to get their smile in full working order is veneers in Liverpool.

In Liverpoool, veneers are one of the most versatile of cosmetic dentistry treatments and it is for this reason that they have become of the most popular. Plenty of dentists, such as Liverpool Smile Studio, offer veneers. The trick is to find a practice with a great track record, possibly even an industry award or two for cosmetic dentistry.

This is because cosmetic dentistry is as much an art as it is a dental treatment. The dentist needs to have a good eye for size, shape and colour and to understand what goes into making a great, natural-looking smile.

What are veneers?

Veneers are tiny sheaths of porcelain that fit over the front of the teeth. They are the dental equivalent of nail extensions, except that they last a whole lot longer. If they are well looked after, veneers can last for at least 10 years and possibly longer. Some people have had their veneers for decades.

Dental porcelain can be sized, shaped and coloured to blend in with the other teeth in the mouth.

What can veneers fix?

Veneers are used to cover up a multitude of imperfections. Surface structure-wise, they cover over chips, cracks and worn edges. They can cover stains that teeth whitening cannot remove. They can be used to make small teeth look bigger and slight wonky teeth look straight.

Are they easy to put on?

Yes. In Liverpool, veneers take a couple of appointments to put in place. One to measure up and determine the required shape and colour, and the second to fix them on. The dentist needs to remove a thin layer of enamel so that they lie flush with the other teeth and to create a rough surface for the fixative to adhere to.

Getting a Divorce: What Happens to Your Joint Insurance Policy?

a couple arguing in front of a lawyerThe entire process of getting a divorce could take months to finish, and often, divorcing couples find it extremely hard to work with each other through issues during this time. For instance, some spouses want to cancel or modify their joint insurance policy during the divorce proceedings since they want to change beneficiaries or don’t want to keep paying for it. While laws differ from one state to another, it’s illegal in most states to cancel joint insurance policies or modify them until the divorce has been finalized.

General court rules on joint insurance policies​

Some states prohibit the cancellation of a joint insurance policy when a divorce is pending. For instance, some states require that divorcing couples file their divorce pleadings along with a certification stating that they didn’t change their insurance within a predetermined time frame before filing for divorce, explains a top divorce attorney in Lynnwood.

Likewise, in some states, once a spouse files divorce, the court would send out automatic restraining orders to keep divorcing couples from conducting specific administrative or financial actions, but not physical contact as is with common restraining orders. While the specific language in the orders differs, they typically include issues with assets, including insurance policies such as health and life insurance.

Also, select life insurance plans have cash value, and courts usually consider this as marital property. This means that it would be up to the court to divide it during the divorce.

What about after the divorce?​

It’s usually up to the divorced couple whether to continue their joint insurance policies. In some cases though, the court might order them to continue or get separate life insurance policies post-divorce. The insurance plan could help the paying spouse with child support and alimony payments, as well as provide a financial cushion in the event of the paying spouse passes away. However, if the paying spouse terminates a court-order insurance plan after divorcing, the receiving spouse could get help from the court to reinforce it.