Changes in the Medical Malpractice Bill

Medical malpractice form and a gavelNo matter how skilled the doctor, some operations still go awry. There are several factors that contribute to this, but when you’re a grieving spouse, parent, or child, you want justice served. Medical malpractice cases have become such a burden that it’s listed as the top reason not to pursue a degree in the field. This means fewer doctors in the future if things don’t change.

Valid Claims

It’s easy enough to lawyer up and accuse a doctor of medical malpractice. A doctor can also easily find representation in Springfield, Illinois, because of the number of medical malpractice attorneys in the area. However, it’s worth noting that not all claims of malpractice even make it to court. This is because there is not enough evidence to go past before trial, meaning the claims are not substantiated enough. For doctors, the time and money spent on lawyers are unnecessary expenses.

Mitigating Operating Costs

Operating a clinic is expensive enough. Adding medical malpractice lawsuit costs on top of that puts a strain on a physician’s finances, which means they need to hike up the cost of their professional services. As they are getting the bulk of their income from patient consultations, this means patients will have to shell out higher costs for the same services. This isn’t to say that the government wants to do away with the complaints and just sweep them under the rug. Valid ones still need to be given the attention they deserve; those that do not fit the recently changed statute of limitations, however, will no longer be entertained. The healthcare bill also limits the fees a lawyer can charge for handling a case.

Changes in the medical malpractice bill aim to protect physicians from undue costs and patients from increased health care prices. If you look at it the right way, it makes sense.